Angliæ speculum
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Angliæ speculum a glass that flatters not : presented to a country congregation at the late solemn fast, April 24, 1678, in a parallel between the kingdom of Israel and England, wherein the whole nation is desired to behold and consider our sin and our danger by

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Published by Printed for Richard Royston ... in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Church of England -- Sermons.,
  • Sermons, English -- 17th century.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesGlass that flatters not, Glass that flatters not.
Statementby a dutiful son of this church.
SeriesEarly English books, 1641-1700 -- 1038:10.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[2], 38 p.
Number of Pages38
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16759401M

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Get this from a library! Angliæ speculum: a glass that flatters not: presented to a country congregation at the late solemn fast, Ap , in a parallel between the kingdom of Israel and England, wherein the whole nation is desired to . Simon Patrick, "Angliæ speculum: a glass that flatters not" () Further reading. Edmund Calamy the Elder, 'A Sermon at London On The Solemn League & Covenant', 14 January "I may truly call these nineteen sins, England's looking-glass, wherein we may see what are the clouds that eclipse God's countenance from shining upon us". Ricardi de Cirencestria Speculum historiale de gestis regum Angliæ Vol v. 1 ; From the copy in the Public library, Cambridge [Richard] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the : Richard. Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Skip to main content. This Speculum historiale de gestis regum Angliæ by Richard, of Cirencester, d. ? Book from the collections of Harvard University Language Latin Volume 1. Book digitized by Google from the library Pages:

  Angliæ speculum: a glass that flatters not: presented to a country congregation at the late solemn fast, Ap , in a parallel between the kingdom of Israel and England, wherein the whole nation is desired to behold and consider our sin and our danger by Simon Patrick 2 editions - first published in Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Angliæ speculum: or Englands looking-glasse.: Devided into two pats [sic], / by Mercer. [ ] Anglo-Judæus, or The history of the Jews, whilst here in England. Relating their manners, carriage, and usage, from their admission by William the Conqueror, to their banishment. Mayor, John E. B. (John Eyton Bickersteth), , ed.: Ricardi de Cirencestria Speculum historiale de gestis regum Angliæ. From the copy in the Public library, Cambridge. From the copy in the Public library, Cambridge.

Biography of William Fiennes. William Fiennes (–) first Viscount Saye and Sele (–), son of Richard Fiennes, lord Saye and Sele, and Constance, daughter of Sir William Kingsmill, was born 28 May , entered at New College as a fellow-commoner in , was admitted a fellow in , and succeeded his father in April (Doyle, Official Baronage, iii. . References Edit. David Laing, "Some account of Lieut.-Colonel William Mercer, Author of 'Angliæ Speculum, OR ENGLAND'S LOOKING-GLASSE', London ", Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, Volume 3 pp –, Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.; David Stevenson, ‘Mercer, William (b. c, d. in or after )’, Oxford Dictionary of National . Moral state. Angliæ speculum morale; the moral state of England Moran, James The composition of reading matter Moran, Patrick Alfred P. An introduction to probability theory Moray, A survey of the province of Morden, Robert Geography rectified, or a description of the world () More, Hannah.   In Mercer's ‘Angliæ Speculum’ (, &c.) there are an anagram and epigram to the ‘famous Poet Captain George Withers.’ Cockain's ‘Divine Blossoms’ () is dedicated to him. The largest collection of Wither's works was in the library of Thomas Corser.